Psalm 62:5-8 – Wait in silence.

For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from him. He only is my rock and my salvation, my fortress; I shall not be shaken. On God rests my salvation and my glory; my mighty rock, my refuge is God. Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

selah

The term “selah” is often said to meant as a call to consider, to meditate on what has been written. And that is what I set out to do this week.

This is a Psalm of confident assurance in God and God alone. This is not the desperate reassurance or the reminding tone of last week’s verse not to fear but trust in the Lord. This is a declaration of God’s greatness, and if nothing else, a lesson for us to rest quietly in the power and wonder of God.

God is a refuge for us, not only doing battle on our behalf, but also encasing us in security. Though from our own point of view we are surrounded on every side, we fear evil and the reproach of the unbelieving public, and feel as though our skin has the edge of their spears already poised and ready to pierce, we see not the spiritual reality.

Psalm 62 rectifies the difference between our eyes and God’s eyes. David declares to all who would hear, “Don’t struggle! Don’t seek for vain glory, or trust in money or your strength!” When Isaiah says “all men are like grass”, he mirrors David in verse 9, “Those of low estate are but a breath; those of high estate are a delusion; in the balances they go up; they are together lighter than a breath.”

This may be one of the biggest perspective switches that have started to breach into my view in the last year. All this, the whole story, the whole song and dance of my time on earth, is not primarily about my relationship with God, though it is an extraordinary and inscrutable thing that he would allow such an exchange. No the story is ALL ABOUT GOD. He is glorious. He is righteous. He is powerful. He ordains and holds ALL THINGS. Not only did he create the universe, but Hebrews 1 tells us :

He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, having become as much superior to angels as the name he has inherited is more excellent than theirs.

You and I have troubles and trials sufficient to fill our minds and fill every single day. Allow yourself to be quiet for a few moments. Listen for his voice. Forget your own weakness. Tell your soul, for God alone to wait, for your only hope is in him.

Though to us it often feels as though we stand upon a precipice, with God as the rope that ties us off, David encourages us to realize that we stand upon the mighty infallible wall of God’s providence. So if you have worry, or fear, or doubt, “Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

Amen.

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Psalm 56:3-4 | What can flesh do to me?

When I am afraid, I put my trust in you. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I shall not be afraid. What can flesh do to me?

In this past week the study and memorization of this passage has already proven helpful. Like all who follow after God, some days finding glory in his words and hanging and meditating on every one, being obedient, praying without ceasing, and seeing Jesus as supremely valuable are easy. But other days temptation is around every corner, my mind is altogether unable to focus on what is good and right and profitable.

I’m not someone who often fears physical harm. But what I do fear is losing focus. Coming to Jesus only when I am desperate only to find when he comforts me and gives strength to me I will grow complacent and make an idol of the closest thing to catch my eye or interest me.

“Prone to wander, Lord I feel it! Prone to leave the God I love! Here is my heart Lord, Take and seal it, seal it for thy courts above.”

David wrote Psalm 56 “when the Philistines seized him at Gath.” And his response is stunning. The beginning of the psalm is David’s only appeal to God for the removal of his trial. “Be gracious to me, O God.” That is all. The entirety of the psalm shows a curious lack of some of the most common Western Christian’s prayers. A prayer for removal of difficulty and the affliction of others.

David knows, or writes more than he knows of something so key. When he is afraid, he puts his trust in God, the God who has written down his name in his book before times eternal. The God who knows and keeps and “upholds the universe by his word of power.”

What can man do to him? God has already called him his own, just as he has called you, if you continue on in the faith, and therefore eternity and glory are sealed. But what may be in David’s words, and have been in my prayers, are the words of pleading for protection against his own flesh as well.

“Lord I am beset by many trials, I feel in my heart that I grow afraid and weak. I feel my heart wander from you, my flesh is what challenges the greatest treasure in my life, and that is your presence Lord, and it is my love for you, even that given by your hand. Strengthen my heart that I might never fear that my own flesh might lead me astray. Have mercy on me. Be gracious. But do justly, and never let me out of your hand.”

David trusts God to call all things into account, that no one who does evil is “getting away” with anything when they come to the judgment seat of Jesus. v. 8 says that God counts all of David’s tossing and has a bottle to catch every one of David’s tears that He might hold them up on that day as a weight to measure out the punishment for the wrongdoer.

Finally, for me, verse 9 holds the words that comfort my soul, and ease the burden of trust. that “Then (when justice comes) my enemies will turn back in the day when I call. This I know, that God is for me.

If you forget verses 3-4, remember those eight words in times of trial.

This I know, that God is for me.

Romans 11:33-36

Oh, the depths of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments and how inscrutable are his ways? “For who has known the mind of the Lord, or who has been his counselor?” “Or who has given a gift to him that he might be repaid?” For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be glory forever. Amen.

This is the response of the apostle Paul after he writes to the church in Rome, telling of how God saw fit to graft in people not of Israel into the vine of salvation. He tells of how God let the people of Israel lapse into unfaithfulness, that his justice and mercy might be shown both to gentiles and not only the people of Israel, based on a promise that is equal in power.

When God called the people of Israel into his hand, to be his people, to follow him, to know, and to obey his commandments and show the world his greatness and righteousness, the vine was full. There were no limbs cut off and no space for you and I on that holy vine. We were lost and destined for destruction, bundles of dry sticks set aside for the fire.

So we too, now, since the coming and sacrifice of Christ, have a place to graft into that salvation, into that adoption! No wonder this is Paul’s exclamation! What a joy! Oh, the depths of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! We have no bloodline to claim, we have no assistance to offer, we have no nationality, no perfection, no intelligence to plea. More than our lack, is his great self-contained power, glory, and good pleasure! How unsearchable are his judgments! How inscrutable are his ways? And after this, “Who has known the mind of the Lord, or who has been his counselor?”

The focus of this passage is that glory be given to God.

We are saved through no merit of our own, by the God of the universe, the one of whom Isaiah likewise speaks in Isaiah 40:12-13

“Who has measured the waters in the hollow of his hand
and marked off the heavens with a span,
enclosed the dust of the earth in a measure
and weighed the mountains in scales
and the hills in a balance?
Who has measured the Spirit of the Lord,
Or what man shows him his counsel?”

The implied answer to all of these and Paul’s questions are NO ONE.

No matter what the world considers wise, no matter what our emotions or experience claim and cry out, no matter what power we think we have, what we think we’re owed or promised, God deserves all glory and all praise. You did not orchestrate your own salvation, you are in his hand because he chose you before the world began. Not because he knew you would believe, but because as the psalmist writes, “All that pleases him, he does.”

Against all our own wisdom and judgments, knowing our own hearts and the actions of others, it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.

Oh the depths! Oh the riches! Oh the wisdom! So unsearchable and inscrutable! Everything is chosen and placed directly by the wisdom and power of the almighty God! So of course He gets the glory! All glory, forever. Amen.

Reading and Response: Jan 6, 2016

Hosea 10:12
“Sow for yourselves righteousness,
reap steadfast love.
Break up your fallow ground,
for it is time to seek the Lord,
that he may come and rain righteousness upon you.”

I was stuck on this phrase “break up your fallow ground” in my morning reading. After some thought it came to me that these are the areas that have been ignored. Areas yet untapped as a resource for being made into the image of God. There are areas in our lives that are laying fallow, and at some point they may not have been ready for growth, but being aware that a day may come for growth in this more difficult soil is key to expansion in faith and belief and sanctification.

So I prayed this morning that all areas in me, even in things I am not naturally disposed to, those areas can be used for growth and for blessing, not just for myself but others. Break up this fallow ground, it is time to seek the Lord, that He may rain down righteousness on me, and you.